Goodbye Summer..

It really doesn't feel like we are saying goodbye to summer, with another week of temperatures in the 30's forecast. The garden is telling me that we are though, with tomatoes coming in every day and beans, oh the beans! Are your outdoors telling you that the seasons are shifting? 


I'm loving these big, juicy tomatoes this year! They can really bulk out a curry and a single slice is enough to add to a sandwich.

 With very little grass around and a pesky fox making annoyingly regular daytime visits, the chooks have been confined more than I like and so are dining on offerings from a bucket rather than picking through the forage themselves. Silverbeet always wins them over, with torn comfrey leaves and seeding lettuce coming in a close second.

 A kilo of homegrown beans were processed last night in the pressure cooker and frozen for future meals. I love having beans in the freezer for Thai green curries. They just aren't the same without them..

 The first pumpkins are coming in and are curing in the sun near our kitchen door. I'm pleased that we have a couple of buttercups (the green ones at the back), as I used saved seed from about three years ago and was a little dubious about it's viability! Obviously, they hang on for quite a while in their dormant state..

One hundred grams of super soft merino top dyed by a lovely spinner was brought home with me last week from spinning group. What to make, what to make? Or rather, more importantly, how to spin it, how to spin it? I have borrowed a most fascinating book from the library and am totally in awe with the unlimited options available when it comes to spinning textured art and novelty type yarns! Truly an art form in itself and a whole other world when compared to the standard two ply yarns I have been spinning up until now ..

 Tomatoes are coming inside daily, ripening further on the bench. The youngest is taking them to school in her lunchbox, I have been pureeing them and adding them to curries and hubby has been frying them up with his Sunday breakfasts. I'm hoping we will have some to preserve/bottle - one of my greatest garden goals!

Things are going well in the sunny hugelkultur bed that was built a few weeks ago when I hosted veggie group here. Two rows of brassicas; broccoli, cauliflower and kale are making their way upwards and outwards under some repurposed curtain netting. The white cabbage moth is still around and I must make a point of being more vigilant about checking for eggs/larvae. Chewed leaves can happen in an instant, leaving only the skeletal remains of a tender young seedling..


Hoping your enjoying the changing of the seasons, be it warm or cold. 
Have a great week out there, peeples!

Comments

  1. Mmmmmm, your tomatoes are making me drool! Mine all died from viral wilt this season :-( I also love, Love, LOVE the colour of your merino top, I can't wait to see what you produce with it. Learning to spin is still on my List of Things to Do, but I think I am leaning towards weaving this year - I have (not very subtly) hinted at a portable knitter's loom for Mother's Day this year, and have my fingers crossed LOL.

    Cheers, Julie

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    1. Weaving is an entirely fascinating craft, isn't it, Julie! Did you happen to see Kevin McCloud's program the other night showing the local 'sisters of the loom' crafting him a hand woven alpaca bath robe? Totally amazing stuff! Good luck with your pending Mother's Day gift, I'm certain you'll put it through it's paces, absolutely! :)

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  2. Very beautiful tomatoes, what type are they. Nice merino tops, spinning doesnt take too long to get used to, but you might want to start on some practice wool before diving into this lovely pile.

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    1. Yes, I hear you Louise, new ventures can always be a little daunting!

      Tomatoes are Brandywine, I think..

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  3. Oh the garden envy I am feeling right now is terrible. It has rained so much here that nothing is growing. All of the seeds I plant just rot. I am having one last try for some climbing beans and they seem to be going ok.

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    1. Oh no, Fiona, how disappointing. My fingers and toes are doubly crossed for your climbing beans. xx

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  4. Oh you inspire me! We have a whole bed which we prepared by filling with compost... before we could plant anything we had a bed full of tomatoes and pumpkins! And the zucchini is still going ridiculously strong. However I was so disappointed by the beans I planted, they all came up, produced about 2 beans then all died off... not sure why. And all my corn got eaten by bugs... oh well, new season to try again!

    What do you freeze your beans in? Do you do individual serving sizes or a big batch?

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    1. How sad to hear of your beans, Emily. To be honest, this season is the best we've had with the beans and I think the success has been planting a lot of them (as in HEAPS!), and also laying soakey hose along the row. I just can't water as efficiently as this little gem. :) Great to hear about your tomatoes and pumpkins, though! Gotta love those volunteers nature throws our way.

      The beans I have been freezing in sandwich size snap lock bags. :)

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  5. What lovely pictures! Here it is still very much winter, but your tomatoes - and those perfect beans! - are making me think about what to plant this year. Glad your pumpkin seeds came through for you, too. I've got some older seeds, mostly flowers, that I'm going to toss into the garden this year, with fingers crossed.
    Now I am craving a fresh tomato. I love the meaty ones, where one slice tops a sandwich!
    Looking forward to seeing what you do with that fiber :)

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    1. Yes, that fiber has caused my brain to go into a constant humming mode, Quinn. The options..
      Best of luck with your seeds, I really hope they come up for you! :)

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  6. I enjoy seeing and reading about your last days of summer as I am watching the last days of winter (in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, USA). Thanks for sharing your beautiful garden. : )

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    1. What I wouldn't give for a little piece of Colorado Rocky Mountain high right now, Kleigh! :)

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  7. Summer is fast disappearing here too, Chris, we've had rain and cooler nights, although the days are still reasonably warm. We don't have any chard in the garden yet - it doesn't seem to survive summer here, but we'll be planting some for winter. And I never thought about processing beans, we've had so many, although we have just been eating them at a rapid clip! :)

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    1. The chard surprised me this year too, Celia, although it is growing in a shady spot under some taller plants. Keeping the water up seems to keep it happy, too. :)

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  8. Yes the not so hot days, cooler nights. to be sure a change in season. i do love Autumn. Your merino fleece looks beautiful. I'll be interested in seeing what you do with it.

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    1. Autumn is the favourite of the seasons here too, Kate. It has to be just around the corner, surely! :)

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  9. I too am having a craving for a fresh tomato after seeing your pictures. Here in the eastern US, they have predicted a foot of snow for us tomorrow. Spring is trying to come, but not before Winter gets the last word.

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    1. So hard to visualise snow right now, live and learn. And a foot of it at that. Stay warm. :)

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  10. Oh beautiful, so much growth. We have had the heat too but the rain seems to have finsihed my summer off in the garden. Lovely lovely. xx

    www.mindfullygreen.com.au

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    1. Yes, we have a few pumpkins forming powdery mildew after the rain, Amber. I guess it's to be expected! Enjoy that garden of yours. :)

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  11. We're just getting close to Spring here and I'm so envious of your beautiful tomatoes. I so look forward to our farmer's markets opening for the season!

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    1. A lovely time of year full of hope and promise of things to come, Bev. Happy Spring! :)

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  12. I can feel spring coming, it's still cold here but warm enough that it has been melting our snow. I look every day to see if enough is gone that I might see some bulbs peeking through, but not yet.

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  13. I haven't noticed any change of season here yet. Still hot and muggy, a line of sweat drop down the back of your shirt after minimal activity...nice. Bring on the scarves and winter boots I say!

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Hi there, so nice of you to stop by! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I love hearing what you are up to. Christine x

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