Friday, May 4, 2012

An easier quince paste

This post could quite rightly be a follow up to my original quince paste post.

I do believe I have found an easier way to make quince paste! Which is a good thing, considering how much time is invested in stirring a pot (cauldron?) of bubbling, lava mass.

Quinces from our neighbour's tree
This time around, after peeling and coring the quinces, the quarters were crammed into our slow cooker, covered with water and left to simmer overnight on low...

Quinces cooking away gently while sleeping? Fantastic!


The following day, they were whizzed in the food processor until they were as smooth as they were going to get..with the addition of a little of the cooking water to help thin them down.


After all the flesh and water had been whizzed, the puree was added to my largest, favourite pot and 3/4 of  the puree weight was added in sugar (for this batch I had 3.6kg of puree and added 2.7kg of sugar..which only just squeezed into my pot - phew!)

This part still takes some time. The enormous mass was heated gently until boiling, removing any scum that rose to the surface and stirring from time to time. I allowed the puree (lava?) to bubble gently for 2 hours while I was busy pottering, doing other things in the kitchen..


...after which time it had thickened to my liking (mix hard to stir, starting to come away from the sides of the pot, glorious deep colour..fearful of burning the heaving mass!).


Pour as usual into parchment paper lined tins and leave to sit for a couple of days before cutting.


Soft, fresh quince paste for cheese and crackers. Or perhaps that should be..cheese and crackers for the sole purpose of carrying quince paste to waiting mouth?


Wrap individual squares in greaseproof paper and store in an airtight container for up to twelve months - but trust me, it will be ALL gone long before then. Because hubby quite likes a late night, quince paste indulgence. And so do I. ;)


I do believe I have become a slow cooking, food processing quince convert. 

How about you? Do you make quince paste? Or jelly perhaps? How do you like to go about it? 

36 comments:

  1. I haven't made quince paste since I gave myself a pretty severe burn a couple of years ago. I'm sitting here looking at six quinces so maybe, just maybe, I'll give this a go.

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  2. Haven't tried to make anything with quinces before but our local fruit shop was selling quinces recently & i'd just been reading a gardening magazine what had quince recipes included. I bought the quinces & had a go at making jelly. Turned out wonderful & tastes fantastic.

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    1. I'd love to give the jelly a go sometime, Jeanette - overnight drip bag and all. ;)

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    2. I cook the whole quinces in the slow cooker overnight then the peels and cores are easy to get out. You don't fit as many in as if they were cut but who needs enough quince paste to feed an army? Then I put the flesh in the food processor. Some I freeze in the pieces cooked and make the paste later it works well. My recipe has 1 for 1 sugar to puree maybe I will try cutting down next time to see how it goes.

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  3. Oh my gosh, that sounds delicious!!

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  4. WOW that is pretty clever, well done!

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  5. What a brilliant idea to cook it all int he crockpot first... I just love quince paste with cheese. I have never seen quinces here though :(

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  6. And it tasted so good on your cheese platter today! The microwave method is quite good too. What a delicious spread quince paste is.

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    1. Thankyou Kirsty, it really is a great spread for a cheesey board, although I do wonder at times when hubby just cuts bits off and eats it ...neat (?). No cracker required? lol!

      Unfortunately this will be the last lot of foraged quinces for sometime as the neighbour's tree blew over in a severe windstorm so will be counting the seasons until our tree fruits! Bugger. :)

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    2. I cook the quince and sugar (half the amount of quince) all day in the slow cooker, on high, lid off. Don't have to fuss with it that much

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  7. Yum, I could do with one of those little crackers you have there right about now... That paste looks divine, I made some last year and it was eaten so quickly.

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  8. I am going to look out for some quinces now!

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  9. that is pretty much how i did my last batch - but I cook the quinces whole in the crock pot and then slice them up the next day after they are cold

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  10. sorry, i didnt mean to be anonymous (above)

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  11. Oh now I have quince paste envy!

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  12. Just wondering do you need to keep it refrigerated?

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    1. No, pantry is fine Dave, as long as they are well wrapped in greaseproof paper and then stored in an airtight container..or further wrapped in foil if a container is not available.

      I have heard of some people storing their paste in the fridge but have also heard that this tends to crystalize it.

      Due to the high sugar content, room temp is fine for up to 12 months (by which time the next round of quinces should be appearing).

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  13. Oh my word, that post made my mouth water!

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  14. Chris, this is a really, really good idea, thank you! We've been making ours in the oven, because as you say, stirring bubbling spitting lava on the stove is never fun.. ;-)

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  15. Oh yum! I only discovered Quince paste about a year ago and to make my own would be wonderful. Thanks for this post.

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  16. your squares of quince paste look so perfect and delicious..yum!

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  17. Oh you ar so clever! It looks delicious, and quince paste is soooo expensive to buy. A lovely reward for your perseverance and experimenting.

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  18. hi just dropping by from TAsmania to say HI... never thought of doing it in my much loved slow cooker...but you have me converted... just made a big batch of lava but i bottled mine..still some quinces about her at the moment so i am going to give your method a try...mmm just thinking of the gorgeous aroma you must have woken up to that morning!!!!!

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    1. It was pretty nice, that aroma Nettie. Thanks for stopping by - happy quincing! :)

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  19. Looks totally delicious. I wish I had the room for quince in my garden. Lucky you.

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  20. Ahhhh.... the crockpot and its never ending uses! I love my crockpot especially when it can spend all day tending to my soups and stews instead of I. I saw some quinces at the local markets - If they are still there I can see quince paste on my horizon (or should that be in my pantry?) - Kara

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  21. Looks amazing! I made so much quince paste 2 years ago that I just finished off the last of it, I was so surprised it kept so well, wrapped in paper, then foil, then in an airtight container. 3 hours of continual stirring kinda put me off making more, but I like your thinking with the slow cooker. Did you think that it tasted just as good because I would definitely like to give that a go.
    Melanie

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    1. The slow cooker takes a whole lot of 'hovering' time out, Melanie and the results were just as good, if not better (for less time in the kitchen) by using the slow cooker. Still that intense quincy hit with each bite. Try it! ;)

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  22. I would to try this...can I ask, is there anyway to reduce the sugar? I know that sounds naff but it's such a lot! I have used my slower coooker to make apple butter...next jams and jellies : )

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    1. Yes, it IS a lot of sugar Stacey although I guess this is what keeps the paste preserved so well for so long? If you were to cut down on the sugar, maybe consume it in less time (say a couple of months) and store it in the fridge? Best of luck! :)

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  23. I just tried making quince paste with your method...brilliant.I purchased last year as a lavish gift to myself a Kenwood Cooking Chef, its a Kenwood Chef with an induction hotplate so all you need to do is puree the quinces put them in the bowl,set the temperature, put it on a slow stir and you don't even need to be in the kitchen, only to check when it's ready!..

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  24. Even easier is to put the whole quinces in the slow cooker overnight, then the peel and the core come off/out easily with the fingers next morning. Might take a few loads but now I freeze the cooked flesh and make things later.
    Consistency is the thing that is hard to get, not long enough and it is jam consistency, too long and it is fruit leather.
    Glenda Australia

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  25. I recommend you try the quince cakes with tortas de aceite and fresh cheese. Delicious!

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  26. Help! I made a batch of quince paste (have made it before and it was beautiful) but I'm very disappointed with this lot - it's very sticky and won't cut clean. I've had it in a low oven for hours and it doesn't make any difference. Can I salvage it?

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    1. Honestly I have left mine for a week never cuts into squares I have it in jars to spread it is a paste so don't stress. However there is a difference between spreadable and sticky, try the slow cooker next time.

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Hi there, so nice of you to stop by! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I love hearing what you are up to. Christine x

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