Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Have wool. Must knit.

This is how I'm feeling this week. Between a relaxed school holiday schedule, a dye pot calling and a new/old spinning wheel just begging to be used, I seem to have yarn coming out of my ears! My head is spinning (oops! no pun intended!!) with possibilities, throbbing with the stress of knitted errors and dropped stitches and aching with anticipation with all the projects I suddenly want to complete! Do you know this feeling? Is it somewhat similar to a squirrel hunkering down in preparation for the cooler months? Hmmm.... I do wonder at times.

 I'll start today with Part 1: The Hulk
(as dixiebelle so accurately described my recent, rather frustrating food dyeing episode!)

 And thus we observe: The Hulk, a transformation..


Remember how it was? That ghastly fibre? All witchy and hulky green?  So, so far from the subtle teal shade I was amateurishly aiming for? Accchh! It pains me to remember.

However, waste not, want not. I got to spinning the lurid fibre and actually had quite a good time in the process, seeing how the different shades of green ended up on the bobbin..

But what to do with my bobbin full of green delight? I decided to ply it with an undyed single of similar thickness and throw the whole lot back in the dye pot again..this time with just blue colouring!

And do you know what? That undyed single soaked up the blue food dye like a sponge and mellowed that horrid green right out, much to my delight!

Ball winding from the skeins. A swift would be nice ;)
Close to 300g of the newly coloured yarn to ponder over..what fun! Sock weight..of a sort.

And yes, a slight 'barber pole' effect, but if it helps to mellow the green, I'm all for that!

Ahh, the options!

To answer the call of the newly coloured fibre, first up it was a neckwarmer on circular needles in a scallop pattern. So much fun to pull out circular needles again! And to follow..perhaps some fingerless mittens to match? What a sight I shall be, trotting down to the paddock to feed the goats and back again to tend the chooks - all the while clad warmly in The Hulk. Transformed.  ;)

Are you knitting? Is the cooler weather to blame? What are you knitting? And what's your favourite colour wool you like to use? 



Scallop Neck Warmer

A ball of 80g or so of sock-ish weight yarn and a 3.75mm circular needle (give or take a size).

Cast on 130sts and knit a couple of rows of garter stitch, joining in the round, placing a marker (or safety pin, ahem!) at the start of round..

Beg pattern:  (stitches should only be counted after 5th and 6th row).
1st row (right side):  *sl 1, k1, psso, k9, k2tog; rep from * to end.
2nd row: knit
3rd row: *sl 1, k1, psso, k7, k2tog; rep from * to end.
4th row: knit
5th row: *sl 1, k1, psso, yf, {k1, yf} 5 times, k2tog; rep from * to end
6th row: purl

These 6 rows form the pattern. Work in pattern until work is desired length and cast of after a 6th row. A shell edging can be crocheted onto cast of edge if desired. Weave in loose ends.

(NB - If using straight needles and joining the neck warmer together after knitting is finished, the 2nd, 4th and 6th rows will need to be reversed for straight needle stitching, ie: 2nd row - purl, 4th row - purl, 6th row - knit. Pattern is worked in multiples of 13, so if a narrower or wider neck measurement is required, adjust stitches to suit). Happy clicking!







30 comments:

  1. Oh, it is gorgeous now. I love that colour! Well done, you are so clever!

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    1. Now who had any idea The Hulk could be so obliging? Thanks for making me smile. :)

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  2. Beautiful colour and very clever knitting! I need to keep practicing, I hope one day I could be half as good as you!

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    1. Just start with those two old faithful stitches, Liz - knit and purl. The rest is all a variation on them. There is so much to learn regarding knitting it can sometimes be a bit overwhelming but the great thing is, is that one can start small and learn as they go...like me..and you! ;)

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  3. It has transformed beautifully, such a lovely colour now. Aren't you clever. And the neck warmer is lovely. I've been thinking of knitting myself one as I always wear a scarf in the cooler months, even have one on today. But in the garden they are always getting in the way. A neck warmer is just the thing I think. Thanks for the pattern.

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    1. Gosh that blue food dye gave me the runaround, Kate! Your reasoning for a neck warmer is exactly the reason why I got to making one..last winter my scarf always ended up in the goats hay bucket and I would spend 10 minutes each day picking all the seeds/hay off it! This will be so much more practical. :)

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  4. The neck warmer is gorgeous and I don't just like the color, I love it. Do you know, I'd never thought of the practicalities of a neck warmer but you and Kate are right. I struggle through winter with a scarf on. I have an added problem in that I get so frustrated I often take it off and lose it. Then I borrow hubby's and get in trouble

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    1. Oh, Linda, you're too funny! I like to knock off hubby's scarves too.. ;)

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  5. What a beautiful colour it is now, who knew the Hulk could be so pretty. The neck warmer looks to be just the ticket.

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  6. that colour combination is just stunning!

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    1. Yes, who knew, Fiona! The Hulk has surprised us all! :)

      It's amazing the difference another strand of wool makes, isn't it Shelley?! :)

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  7. The colour is beautiful! I love blues and greens but I seem to end up knitting a lot of red. Baby things mostly. I had not thought of the practicalities of a neck warmer either. I will definitely be putting a neck warmer in my queue!

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    1. Reds are where I want to beeee, kimbamel! You knit such lovely baby items..really sweet. ;)

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  8. Beautiful colour! I do need to get back to knitting, but I am only a very basic knitter. However I have a half made square beany I need to finish for my wo year old, before the real cold hits.

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    1. I'm sure your little one will love it, Kirsten! If you're anywhere near us you'll have a bit of time before it needs finishing..the next week is meant to be gorgeous weather.

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  9. Oh your beautiful beautiful blue!! I have a new/old wheel that I've yet to spin on, you've completely inspired me. MUST get it out of that shipping container in the shed and get spinning. Your neckwarmer is delicious.

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    1. Must, must, must!! Do please get it out of the container, I would love to see what you get up to with it!

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  10. Does that mean the new yarn is called Dr. Bruce Banner? ;-)

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    1. Haha, yes, quite clever, Kathryn! I like it!!

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  11. I have 'startitis' too. Must be the cooler weather.

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    1. It's kind of overwhelming, Chez..but good fun. :)

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  12. oh gosh that is so pretty - it never gets cold enough here to wear a scarf, but if it did i could see the use for one of those.

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  13. Replies
    1. Thanks, africanaussie and Sherri. I do think I like the cold weather because half the fun of it is rugging up! I know it gets mighty cold where Sherri is! :)

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  14. that is amazing, seeing that bag of wool transformed all the way to an actully thing. THANKYOU!!

    Dianne

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    1. Yes, this full circle still fascinates me, Dianne. Amazing to think that all the woolly garments we see were once fibre on an animals back!

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  15. You've started a fascination for dying here.... I'm starting to research the least messy way (it's a small house with small people running about underfoot at the same time) to get started with some homespun yarn. I love being inspired by you!

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    1. Exceelllent, Kate! I do like to sneakily get people inspired. If you have a microwave that could be a good way to go..otherwise Katja left a great comment in one of my recent dyeing posts about steaming skeins of yarn in foil, rolled up like snails. This sounds like it could be a good thing to try. Although to be honest, a little pot from the op shop at the back of the stove slowly heating with food dye, vinegar and water is not much messier at all. And you know that it doesn't contain any harmful mordants (hence fumes) that commercial dyes sometimes require. ;)

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  16. I love the colour variation through the wool Christine, the idea of a slightly lucky-dip outcome with the dying is really fun! (And you could definitely take some of that to the Spinners Guild... ;-) )

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  17. See, now it is the Gringe after the Christmas offered to him by a young and warmhearted girl.

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Hi there, so nice of you to stop by! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I love hearing what you are up to. Christine x

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